On describing word order

One aspect that is always discussed in language descriptions, no matter how short they may be, is word order. Beginning with Greenberg 1963, it has been common to talk about word order using expressions such as "X is an 
One aspect that is always discussed in language descriptions, no matter how short they may be, is word order. Beginning with Greenberg 1963, it has been common to talk about word order using expressions such as "X is an SOV language", where "S" represents "subject", "0" represents "object", and "V" represents "verb". Statements such as this are based on an assumption of comparability, an assumption that all languages manifest the categories represented by "S", "0", and "V" (among others), and that word order in all languages can be described (and compared) using these categories.
show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

  • Export Bibtex
  • Export RIS

Additional Services

    Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Randy J. LaPolla, Dory Poa
URN:urn:nbn:de:hebis:30-1157548
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of Publication (online):2010/07/13
Year of first Publication:2006
Publishing Institution:Univ.-Bibliothek Frankfurt am Main
Release Date:2010/07/13
SWD-Keyword:Wortstellung
Source:http://victoria.linguistlist.org/~lapolla//rjlapolla/papers/describingwo.pdf ; (in:) Catching Language: The Standing Challenge of Grammar Writing, ed. by Felix Ameka, Alan Dench, & Nicholas Evans. - Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2006, S. 269-295
HeBIS PPN:228846587
Dewey Decimal Classification:400 Sprache
Sammlungen:Linguistik
Linguistic-Classification:Linguistik-Klassifikation: Syntax
Licence (German):License Logo Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen

$Rev: 11761 $